The EnvComm Blog

Picture a hand holding up a small empty picture frame looking out over a bluff above a beach.

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The IECA's picture

Taylor & Francis and the International Environmental Communication Association (IECA) are pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Matthew Nisbet as the new Editor-in-Chief of Environmental Communication, starting from 1 January 2017, succeeding Dr. Alison Anderson of Plymouth University, UK. Dr. Nisbet is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies at Northeastern University, USA.

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The IECA's picture

The IECA's 2017 Conference on Communication and Environment will be hosted by IECA founding member Anders Hansen at the University of Leicester in Leicester England. The conference will take place June 29 to July 2, 2017 with pre-conference events on June 28.

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When it comes to talking about the environment, the Pope’s message of compassion stood in clear contrast to Volkswagen’s fraudulent marketing in 2015.

Experts in communicating about environmental issues have voted Pope Francis the “Environmental Communicator” of the year for 2015, and chosen Volkswagen as the “Environmental Miscommunicator" of the year.

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Alison Anderson's picture
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Alison Anderson's picture

Francis Lee (Chinese University of Hong Kong), author of ‘Economic Conditions, the Policy Cycle, and Media Visibility of Environmental Organizations’ provides a timely analysis of the factors that affect media visibility of environmental groups in his latest article published in Environmental Communication.

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Marianna Poberezhskaya's picture

The Paris deal generally got a very good press. Most reporting in the immediate aftermath had a similar focus on a few key headline points: this was a “landmark victory”, albeit one with a few cautionary notes. Yet a closer look reveals some telling differences.

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Anabela Carvalho's picture

On Saturday morning, as the COP continued past schedule with successive postponements of the release of the agreement text, which was going to be, in all likelihood, a watered down, strategically vague version of what the world needs, I found myself wondering what to do. Having been all week at Le Bourget conference centre as an observer representing IECA, I decided to spend that day on the other side of history, the side of the citizens in the streets of Paris who defiantly organized several demonstrations to express their resolve in struggling for a better planet (eventually authorized by the police the day before).

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Gregg Walker's picture

As I begin to write this, I am sitting a COP 21 plenary room, La Loire, on Saturday 12 December 2015 with two thousand others; from both country delegations and civil society organizations.  We gather in an “overflow” room, watching events taking place in the adjacent plenary room, La Seine.  In that room, French Foreign Minister and COP 21 President Laurent Fabius is highlighting key parts of the “Paris Agreement.”  After more than two decades of negotiations, 196 countries have apparently agreed to a legally binding document to collectively confront the causes and impacts of climate change.

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Chui-Ling Tam's picture

During the 4th Paris Committee meeting on Wednesday Dec 9, as individual countries and regional coalitions responded to the “ambitious” draft text that would be the almost penultimate version of the agreement coming out of COP21, an increasingly powerful and repeated refrain was the “red line” of 1.5 degrees Celsius. Delegate after delegate asserted that 1.5 was the deal-breaker, the line of last defence, the line that defined possibility and certain death for numerous Small Island Developing States and the many states bordering on the oceans.

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