One-Planet Talking blog

Picture a hand holding up a small empty picture frame looking out over a bluff above a beach.

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Giles Dodson's picture

[This post is part of a series offered by IECA members attending COP22 in Marrakech.]

Another focus of discussion at COP22 has been capacity building.  Capacity building is explicitly mentioned within several UNFCCC instruments, including several Articles of the Paris Agreement.  Article 11 has produced the formation of the Paris Committee on Capacity Building.

A stimulating side event yesterday focused on the role of universities within global capacity building.

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Giles Dodson's picture

[This post is part of a series offered by IECA members attending COP22 in Marrakech.]

Marrakech is certainly an atmospheric location for COP22 and the old town Medina, the souks, pumping music and motorbikes provide a marked contrast to the highly structured and sedate environment of the COP. 

Much of the discussion in the UNFCCC events is generally dry and technical, as befits a UN mega-event.

The reporting at both the multilateral assessments and Ad Hoc Committee on implementation was as dry as the surrounding Marrakech desert.

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Stacey Sowards's picture

[This post is part of a series offered by IECA members attending COP22 in Marrakech.]

Today is gender day at the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), COP 22.  With that in mind, I would like to share a few thoughts about gender, environmental justice, and connections to climate change.  I attended a panel sponsored by the Women and Gender Constituency, which focused on technical, non-technical, and transformative approaches to addressing gender and climate change.  Women's leadership in all parts of the world is essential for how we understand and deal with climate change, which is even more on my mind given last week's election in the United States.

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Chui-Ling Tam's picture

[This post is part of a series offered by IECA members attending COP22 in Marrakech.]

At COP21 last year, a strained air of defiance and urgency permeated Paris, still reeling from the lethal Nov. 13 terrorist attacks launched by extremist forces under the guise of Islam. COP21 delegates and other visitors arriving in the City of Light a scant two weeks later were greeted by constant reminders of the attacks: impromptu shrines to the victims, police tape across bombed restaurants, the very visible and heavily armed security presence, and banners proclaiming "Je suis en terrasse" as French citizens reclaimed their public spaces.

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Stephen Depoe's picture

IECA members and colleagues:  I write on the morning after the U. S. Presidential election.  The American voters have elected Donald Trump to the highest office in our country.  As we all think about the many ramifications of that electoral decision, I want to pose this proposition to you--

IECA is needed, now more than ever.

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Stacey Sowards's picture

Hi all,

The IECA board election ends this Friday, November 11.  It's an important civic duty not just for our communities, but our organization's health as well.

I'll be at the UN Convention on Climate Change next week, so expect to be hearing more from me then.

Thanks,

Stacey Sowards

IECA board member until 2017

Professor & Chair, Department of Communication

The University of Texas at El Paso

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Alison Anderson's picture

ec-cover-vol-10.jpgEnvironmental Communication, Volume 10, Issue 6, December 2016 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.
Special Issue: Spectacular Environmentalisms: Media, Knowledge and the Framing of Ecological Politics.
Guest Editors: Jo Littler, Michael K. Goodman, Dan Brockington and Max Boykoff This new issue contains the following articles:

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Alison Anderson's picture

Angela Smith (University of Sunderland, UK) and Philip Drake (Edge Hill University, UK) authors of "Belligerent broadcasting, male anti-authoritarianism and anti-environmentalism" provide a timely analysis of anti-environmentalism in Top Gear, the hugely popular UK television series.

Top Gear is the BBC’s most-watched and most profitable programme, with extensive franchising of both format and associated merchandise. It was, conversely, the BBC’s most controversial show, with repeated official complaints to the broadcasting standards authority (OfCom) and, eventually, widespread media disdain for the main presenter, Jeremy Clarkson. In the end, this all built up to a climactic crisis in late 2015 after Clarkson hit a member of the production team off-camera when filming. Clarkson’s contract had been due for renewal at this point and so, in the face of mounting media pressure, the BBC was left with little choice but to not renew that contract nor that of the two co-presenters, Richard Hammond and James May. A new presenting team emerged, including US actor Mat LeBlanc, German racing driver Sabine Schmitz, F1 racing team owner Eddie Jordan, and lesser-known motoring journalist Chris Harris, and after a public audition, Rory Reid. Headed by TV and radio presenter Chris Evans, the team seemed to represent many of the topics that had been the ‘soft’ target of Clarkson’s Top Gear: race, gender, xenophobia. The show was also split into two sections, with the online TV station BBC3 showing Extra Gear in which Harris and Reid reproduced the more in-depth car reviews and the ‘news’ section that had previously formed part of the main show’s format. The six-episode series that was first broadcast in 2016, with Chris Evans and Matt LeBlanc as lead hosts, was alternatively criticized for being ‘too similar’ to the Clarkson era show, or ‘not at all like’ this. This leads us to the conclusion that there is a certain invisible factor at work in the show that led to its global popularity and widespread derision. 

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Richard Doherty's picture

As the IECA Vice Chair, one of the cool tasks I have is to encourage members to self-nominate for the Board of Director positions. I would like to encourage you to do that now.  Here are a few thoughts you might consider:  

- My late husband could always find the good in something. When I would get frustrated and say how I hated something (say, the way the media reported on the environment) he insisted I say five things that I loved. Sometimes it was hard to find five related things that I loved. It made me realize how much we can focus on the negative and it makes us blind to the positive things.

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Stephen Depoe's picture

IECA colleagues and others who teach environmental communication:  I have now required students in my COMM/EVST 4067 (Environmental Communication) class at the University of Cincinnati to become members of IECA for a couple of semesters.  We leverage members-only content, including the membership list, the "EC list" newsletter, and the journal ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION, throughout the course.  This practice also teaches students what it means to join a professional association.  The students and I have gained significant value from this required class element at a very reasonable cost to students (currently $76 including journal subscription).

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